čes | eng | fra | deu
 
Google Translate of English 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Russian and World music CD DVD shop and Classic distribution

 

Oboe

   Les titres retrouvé: 64
 

Baroque Bassoon Concertos - Daniel Smith

Baroque Bassoon Concertos -  Daniel Smith
ID: RRC1169
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection:
Bassoon Collection
Subcollection: Oboe

J C Bach / Vivaldi / Hertel / Hargrave / Graupner.
10.00 eur Buy

Telemann - Oboe Music - Holliger, oboe

Telemann - Oboe Music - Holliger, oboe
ID: RRC1343
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection:
Baroque
Subcollection: Oboe

10.00 eur Buy

Vivaldi, Bach, Marcello, Telemann - Concertos for Oboe and Orchestra - Vladimir Kurlin, oboe

Vivaldi, Bach, Marcello, Telemann - Concertos for Oboe and Orchestra - Vladimir Kurlin, oboe
ID: CDMAN159
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

Recorded by Petersburg Recording Studio in 1971 and 1977

4 - 6: Lazar Gosman, violin / Vitaly Buyanovsky, horn / Vladimir Shalyt horn
10, 11: Olga Krylova, harpsichord
11.00 eur Buy

Telemann - Don Quixote. Table Music - Kurlin,oboe - Gosman, conductor

Telemann - Don Quixote. Table Music - Kurlin,oboe - Gosman, conductor
ID: CDMAN171
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection:
Baroque
Subcollection: Oboe

Recorded by Petersburg Recording Studio, 1967 and 1977
11.00 eur Buy

Lute Music of the 16th - 17th Centuries

Lute Music of the 16th - 17th Centuries
ID: CDMAN181
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Lute

11.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Kuhn: Songs and Instrumental Works / Anderson, Ager, et al

Kuhn: Songs and Instrumental Works / Anderson, Ager, et al
ID: GMCD7284
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

Recorded: St Paul’s Boy’s School, Hammersmith, London 12-13 June 2004

The composer Max Kuhn was born on 28 April 1896 - the year of Bruckner’s death, the year before Brahms’s - in Zurich, and he lived almost the whole of a long and active life in the vicinity of the city. After his school education he studied piano with Peter Fassbänder and organ with Fridolin Roth, and then from 1920 to 1921 was a student at the Zurich Conservatory. The influence of Ferruccio Busoni, who had spent a self-imposed exile in Zurich during World War I, was palpable at the Conservatory at this time. Kuhn studied conducting with Volkmar Andreae, a close friend of Busoni; counterpoint with Busoni’s pupil Philipp Jarnach; and composition with another Busoni pupil, Reinhold Laquai. Kuhn then spent five years, until 1926, in further studies in Vienna - becoming a pupil of Josef Hoffmann for piano, and of Richard Stöhr for counterpoint. By the time he returned to Switzerland, therefore, Kuhn was a highly qualified musician in several spheres; even so he went on in 1929 to take some conducting lessons from Felix Weingartner in Basel.

From the 1920s onward, Kuhn was based in Küsnacht, near Zurich, as organist and choir director at the Catholic church. In 1928 he founded the ‘Choir for modern Music’ - later to be known, under its subsequent conductor, as the Zurich Chamber Choir. In 1940 Max Kuhn helped to found the Mozart Society of Zurich, and he remained working in Zurich for many years as a conductor, pianist and organist. He also taught piano and music theory, not only privately but, from 1956 to until his retirement in 1972, at the Zurich Music Academy. Kuhn was spoken of as one of those Swiss composers who made a bridge in their work between Spanish and Swiss music, and between the Protestant North and the Mediterranean warmth of the South. He certainly had an attachment to the music of Spain, and especially the Canary Islands, which gave rise to his Piano Variations (1967) and the piano concerto entitled Concierto de Tenerife (1962), both available on other Guild recordings. In 1991, at the venerable age of 94, Kuhn moved to Ascona, on the Swiss shore of Lake Maggiore, where he died three years later.

According to the noted Swiss critic Willi Schuh, Kuhn’s was a ‘pronouncedly lyrical talent’, with songs and choral music occupying a place of importance in his output. Nevertheless he composed prolifically in a wide spectrum of genres, from operas to small piano pieces. Chris Walton has remarked that Kuhn ‘was rooted in the Swiss Protestant tradition’, but his musical language is an urbane synthesis of several 20th-century tendencies. Kuhn himself, in 1973, described the evolution of his musical language thus: ‘Before 1921, my works were rooted in traditional influences (Bach, Schubert, Wolf). The confrontation with Impressionism and the Second Viennese School and my encounter with Hindemith broadened my means of expression in matters of harmony and formal technique, and enabled me to go my own way (the use of extended tonality, polyphony, and linear counterpoint that takes into account the extended harmonic context)’.
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

The Art of Han de Vries - Oboe Concertos

The Art of Han de Vries - Oboe Concertos
ID: CC2004
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

The CD booklet contains an interview with Han de Vries (printed in English, French and German), in which he talks about
all the works on the CD. There are photos of him throughout his career, and of his extensive instrument collection.

Jeremy Polmear talks to Han de Vries about two of the concertos on the CD:

BACH CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND OBOE:
JP: Am I right in thinking that this recording has not been issued commercially before?
H de V: Yes, it was commissioned by a major Dutch bank - the Verenigde Spaarbank - for its employees. This bank is a good sponsor of the arts as well as sport, and I am glad that one of its products is coming out into the wider world.
JP: And you had no conductor; how did you work out the interpretation?
H de V: The Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra is made up of the best players in the Concertgebouw Orchestra, and when I played with that orchestra Jaap van Zweden the violin soloist was the leader, and they are wonderful musicians who have worked with Harnoncourt, with Chailly. So the way to approach this music was very clear to us.
JP: By 1986 when you made this recording, you had played Baroque oboe for many years, but here you are playing Baroque music on the modern oboe. Were you influenced by baroque practices?
H de V: Yes of course, and I've been playing Baroque instruments since I was 28. But to play in the Baroque style on the modern oboe, with little or no vibrato, would sound cold and unfeeling. I also have a loyalty to my teachers, to the style of the Concertgebouw, to the musicians I admire, and to the other players. I don't want to be an island of 'I am right'. I want to be somebody who communicates with other musicians, and to the ears of the audience; if I have the joy of being surrounded by very good musicians then I feel I am at my best.

ANDRIESSEN, ANACHRONIE II ('furniture music'):
JP: Let me start by asking you not about the music, but about the words. There seems to be what sounds like railway announcements at the beginning, at the end, and a bit in the middle of this concerto, and as a non Dutch speaker I must ask you - what is the gentleman saying, and does it matter?
H de V: It doesn't matter. In the score there is written a part for Radio. So it can start witrh a weather forecast, or anything. And then the music is a tapestry of quotations, and crazy humouristic, or agressive moments. It starts like Michel Legrand. Then we get a quasi Vivaldi oboe concerto, then an incredible crazy cadenza that ends with the soloist becoming totally insane. Then comes a sort of funeral march of drunken horns. This piece comes from 1969 where all music was quoting others, with bits of Stravinsky and everything mixed upside-down; it is a reaction against so-called 'beautiful music'. Andriessen said to use no vibrato. Sometimes I couldn't resist it, because I thought 'this is too much, too long, too ugly'.
JP: Did you commission the piece?
H de V: I asked him to write an oboe concerto, but the ideas are all his; and he never asked me whether what he had written was possible or impossible to play. In the cadenza he wanted a sort of shawm sound - he actually said 'like a bagpipe' - and I must say it should have been much more agressive and ugly, but there I felt I had to fight for my oboe, and not destroy the ears of my listeners.
JP: But I couldn't help noticing when you were listening to it, the part that amused you most of all was the bit in the cadenza where you honk on low and high notes. Why is that so much fun to hear?
H de V: Yes, because that's the utmost ugly playing, it's leaving behind everything that is beautiful on an oboe - as if a drunken man picks it up and tries to play it. And I laughed because I had to give up all the beauty I always worked for in my life. © 2002 Han de Vries and Jeremy Polmear
12.00 eur Buy

Ready Steady Blow! - Music for beginner oboists

Ready Steady Blow! - Music for beginner oboists
ID: CC2010
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection:
Instrumental
Subcollection: Oboe

This CD is recorded by the Graduate Students of Trinity College of Music in London, who took their post-Graduate Diploma in performing in June 2004

In the CD booklet the oboists talk about how they got started on the oboe. It has 16 pages in full colour (English only), with more photos and information, and how to obtain the music.

The main purpose of this CD is to show that there is a wealth of good music, in many styles, available to the oboe beginner. These pieces are within the general Grade 3 level, and some of them can be played after just a few lessons, so that learning the oboe can be a musical experience right from the beginning. The tracks are marked 0 to 3, to indicate their general technical level, where 0 indicates a pre-Grade 1 piece.
There are two exceptions to the Grade 3 limit - Mozart's La ci Darem (Grade 4), because it points the way to a new world of musical expression, and Hedwig's Theme from Harry Potter, because, as one teacher put it, it is by far the nicest way to learn the bottom two notes on the oboe.
The selection was made in consultation with a number of teachers. I asked them which pieces their pupils responded to with enthusiasm. I soon noticed the same pieces being mentioned time and again. Some pieces were liked by some teachers and not by others, and I added in my own preferences, and take full responsibility for the final choice.
It was also necessary to stick to a smallish number of books or tutors, so that the pupil is not faced with a large music bill. Where only one piece has been included from a particular collection, it always means that there are other equally good pieces in that book. Exclusion of a book of pieces does not mean it is not good. Attention was also paid to the various exam syllabuses for Grades 1 to 3; some of these pieces appear there, some do not.
12.00 eur Buy

Music for Oboe, Horn and Piano

Music for Oboe, Horn and Piano
ID: CC2022
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

The 20-page full colour CD booklet has a 3,000 word programme note in English with full details of each track.
There are biographies of the players, web links and many photographs.

Introduction by Jeremy Polmear:

In the realm of chamber music the combination of oboe, horn and piano is an unusual one. The string quartet medium reigns supreme in its ability to inspire great works from great composers. There are many reasons for this, one being that in a string quartet each instrument has its own character, but all are of the same family so that they can also blend as a unit. Each can add its voice on equal terms to the others, speaking the same language but with its own individual accent.

By contrast the wind quintet of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn is all just that - contrast. Each instrument occupies its own sound-world, its own unique colour. This is what makes these instruments so valuable in an orchestra, but can be a challenge in a chamber music context. It takes a very skilful composer - and skilful performers too - to create satisfying blends with these instruments.

It is perhaps no accident that when Mozart wrote chamber music for flute, oboe, clarinet, and horn, he did so individually, in works with strings. Or he added a piano to smooth out the sound, as in the celebrated Quintet K452 with oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn. On this CD we have done something similar with his Horn Quintet K407; although the violin part is now on the oboe, the two violas and cello are given to the piano.

And it is the piano that is the key to the possibilities of the trio with oboe and horn. Even when it is an accompanying role it can provide a mellow presence and a solid harmonic basis, over which the other instruments can sing. This is true in the Mozart, and also in the two short nineteenth century pieces recorded here, by Blanc and Molbe.

And what of the other two instruments? The US horn player Cynthia Carr, in the introduction to her repertoire list of music for the trio, puts it thus: "This ensemble - comprised of the most distinctive-sounding woodwind instrument and the most versatile member of the brass family - presents a rich tonal palette and can produce a wide range of textures, from delicate and transparent to full and orchestral." This can be seen in this CD particularly in the Herzogenberg Trio Op 60 (1889), and in the way that Jean-Michel Damase makes full, and delightful, play of all the possibilities in his Trio of 1990. The oboe cannot match the horn in terms of dynamic range, but its timbre means that it can still be heard, even when both the other instruments are at full stretch. Meanwhile, within the context of the piano sound, the two instruments can celebrate their differences - the oboe melodic and poignant, the horn warm and noble.

In her repertoire list, Cynthia Carr lists nearly forty compositions. There is a genre here, but it is miniscule compared to the repertoire for a string quartet or even a wind quintet. This is because the oboe/horn/piano trio has never been a standard instrumental combination, never part of a European Court as, for example, the Wind Band octets were. Compositions have come about in a more haphazard way. The nineteenth century was a bad one for wind chamber music players - only Schumann and Brahms among the major composers wrote anything. Where they did, it was for specific players, for example the clarinettist Richard Mühlfeld for whom Brahms wrote the Clarinet Quintet. For this Trio there are two keynote nineteenth century pieces - the Herzogenberg Trio already mentioned, and one by Carl Reinecke, written in 1887.

During the 20th Century there were a smattering of works, but the increase in interest didn't come about until late in the century, with the rise of oboe/horn/piano trios in the US, particularly Cynthia Carr's own Trio Arundel, and the horn player Martin Webster of the Hancock Chamber Players. They not only wanted to play music, but were willing to commission pieces, resulting in Paul Basler's jazzy Vocalise-Waltz of 1996 (commissioned by Cynthia) and the Damase Trio mentioned above, commissioned by Martin.

To these people we owe a debt for opening up new possibilities in the under-exploited world of wind chamber music.
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Birtwistle - Orpheus Elegies - Three Bach Arias

Birtwistle - Orpheus Elegies - Three Bach Arias
ID: CC2020
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Voices

Sir Harrison Birtwistle’s compositional life from the mid 1970s to the 1980s was dominated by his opera The Mask of Orpheus, and the same period saw the origin of the Elegies, written for Melinda Maxwell and Helen Tunstall while they were working with the composer at the National Theatre.
‘They are like enchanted preludes…Enchantingly performed here’ The Sunday Times


The 24-page full colour CD booklet has a 6,000 word programme note in English including details of the Orpheus myth and Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus, an interview with Sir Harrison Birtwistle, and a detailed track-by-track
guide, including translations. There are biographies of all the players and many photographs.


Introduction by Melinda Maxwell:

The myth of Orpheus and his music has occupied Sir Harrison Birtwistle (universally known as Harry) for most of his life, and the 26 Orpheus Elegies for oboe, harp and counter-tenor are a further comment in miniature on that myth. They are a re-telling of the story, and the mystery and power that surrounds an imagined music of Orpheus; music that represents a combination of the ethereal - Apollo - and the earthly - Dionysius; music that seduced creation itself with its power of expression.

The Sonnets to Orpheus by Rainer Maria Rilke, known to Harry for a long time, gradually became part of the composition process, and as the music was being written certain words and phrases from those sonnets seemed to clarify and strengthen the meaning of the music.

In time, Harry found that for some of the Elegies, a phrase was not enough. In Elegies 11, 13 and 14 the sonnets are set for voice in their entirety. The voice part is for counter -tenor and written for Andrew Watts. In Elegies 17, 20 and 26 portions of a sonnet are sung. For the remaining twenty Elegies, a phrase taken from a sonnet is written at the end of the instrumental music. For example, Elegy 12 (CD track 16) is fast, manic, rhythmic and repetitive, and the written words are the penultimate line of Sonnet number 5 from Rilke's first set: "the lyre's bars do not constrain his hands". As an aside these words add further meaning to the music, and the music evokes the atmosphere of the words.

Early on in the compositional process, Harry asked me about unusual sounds on the oboe, sounds encompassing harmonics and multiphonics (combinations of sounds that speak together forming chords that have unusual pitch formations and are mostly non-diatonic). I played some to him and wrote down those he liked. He particularly liked pitches that transformed and hung into multiphonics In Elegy 7 these sounds are used almost exclusively, to produce a music that is eerie and other-worldly, finishing with Rilke's words "[He emerged like] ore from the stone's silence". In the very first Elegy based around the note E, Birtwistle uses a double harmonic of an open fifth on E to splice, enrich and delve inside the sound, reaching further depths of expression. Rilke's words for this stark opening are "A tree has risen. Oh pure transcendence!".

Three of the Elegies use metronomes, and these give out a mechanical, inevitable, sense to the music. Elegy 25 uses two metronome pulses at slightly different speeds; Rilke's words are "Does time, the wrecker, really exist?".

The idea for the piece began in the late 1970s when Harry and I and the harpist Helen Tunstall were working at the National Theatre in London, and he expressed the wish to write a piece for oboe and harp. The first draft was written for the 2003 Cheltenham Festival, although not all the Elegies were completed and it was still a work in progress. Certain revisions and further additions ensued, and a longer version appeared in the 2004 Cheltenham Festival. Betty Freeman paid for the commission and Heinz and Ursula Holliger gave the world premičre with Andrew Watts at the Lucerne Festival in September 2004. The London premičre was given by myself, Helen and Andrew in October 2004 at the South Bank.

Throughout many rehearsals and subsequent performances in the UK and at the Holland (2006) and Bregenz (2007) Festivals, Harry offered further insights into our interpretations of phrase, nuance, pace and dynamics, and this recording is the culmination of this entire process. It is a piece full of contrasting voices, from music that is by turns warm, tender, almost wistful, and also bold, relentless, sometimes violent. Each Elegy speaks with its own voice, and such is the power of the composer's invention one feels that many more could follow.
12.00 eur Buy

 
Client: not signed in

CD DVD SACD
Thematic search:
  • Les titres
  • Les compositeurs
  • Les interpretes 
  • Orchestre
  • Chef d'orchestre
  • Instruments
  • Genre
  • Marques
  • Les collections
  • Indice
 
We accept PayPal
facebook
With the purchase of more
than 5 CD - your discount
will be 10%. If more than 10 CD - 15%
© 2004 - 2020

RCD - Russian Compact Disk - Russian and World music CD shop and Classic distribution.

All rights reserved.