čes | eng | fra | deu
 
Google Translate of English 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Russian and World music CD DVD shop and Classic distribution

 

Organ Collection, page 7

   Found CDs: 297
 

KOMPONISTINNEN - Orgelmusik - Baumgratz

KOMPONISTINNEN - Orgelmusik - Baumgratz
ID: IFO00040
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

D, Bremen, Dom St. Petri (Sauer-Orgel)

Cecilie Chaminade.
1.La Nef Sacree Op. 171: Offertoire In D-Moll (5:18)
2.La Nef Sacree Op. 171: Pastorale In A-Moll (3:39)
3.La Nef Sacree Op. 171: Marche Funebre In C-Moll (3:28)
4.La Nef Sacree Op. 171: Corege Nuptial In B-Dur (6:20)
5.Prelude Et Fugue (5:17)
Elsa Barraine.
6.Prelude Et Fugue (5:47)
7.Organ Symphony In H-Moll: Moderato (11:04)
Elfrida Andrée.
8.Organ Symphony In H-Moll: Fugato (2:49)
9.Organ Symphony In H-Moll: Cantabile (4:19)
10.Organ Symphony In H-Moll: Finale (5:45)
11.Praeludium Und Fuge In G-Moll: Praeludium (2:23)
Clara Schumann (Clara Wieck).
12.Praeludium Und Fuge In G-Moll: Fuge (2:40)
13.Praeludium Und Fuge In B-Dur: Praeludium (2:06)
14.Praeludium Und Fuge In B-Dur: Fuge (3:02)
15.Praeludium Und Fuge In D-Moll: Praeludium (2:26)
16.Praeludium Und Fuge In D-Moll: Fuge (3:16)


Wolfgang Baumgratz, organ: An der Sauer-Orgel des St. Petri Doms Bremen
12.00 eur Buy

Mendelssohn - Orgeltranskriptionen - Johannes Geffert - Abtei Himmerod

Mendelssohn - Orgeltranskriptionen - Johannes Geffert - Abtei Himmerod
ID: ORG72322
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Johannes Geffert an der großen Klais-Orgel der Zisterzienserabtei Himmerod, Eifel
12.00 eur Buy

20 th Century Swiss Organ Music - Jeremy Filsell, organ

20 th Century Swiss Organ Music - Jeremy Filsell, organ
ID: GMCD7285
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Recorded: The Organ of the Reformierte Evanglische Kirche Küsnacht/Zurich, Switzerland

The composer Max Kuhn was born on 28 April 1896 - the year of Bruckner’s death, the year before Brahms’s - in Zurich, and he lived almost the whole of a long and active life in the vicinity of the city. After his school education he studied piano with Peter Fassbänder and organ with Fridolin Roth, and then from 1920 to 1921 was a student at the Zurich Conservatory. The influence of Ferruccio Busoni, who had spent a self-imposed exile in Zurich during World War I, was palpable at the Conservatory at this time. Kuhn studied conducting with Volkmar Andreae, a close friend of Busoni; counterpoint with Busoni’s pupil Philipp Jarnach; and composition with another Busoni pupil, Reinhold Laquai. Kuhn then spent five years, until 1926, in further studies in Vienna - becoming a pupil of Josef Hoffmann for piano, and of Richard Stöhr for counterpoint. By the time he returned to Switzerland, therefore, Kuhn was a highly qualified musician in several spheres; even so he went on in 1929 to take some conducting lessons from Felix Weingartner in Basel.

From the 1920s onward, Kuhn was based in Küsnacht, near Zurich, as organist and choir director at the Catholic church. In 1928 he founded the ‘Choir for modern Music’ - later to be known, under its subsequent conductor, as the Zurich Chamber Choir. In 1940 Max Kuhn helped to found the Mozart Society of Zurich, and he remained working in Zurich for many years as a conductor, pianist and organist. He also taught piano and music theory, not only privately but, from 1956 to until his retirement in 1972, at the Zurich Music Academy. Kuhn was spoken of as one of those Swiss composers who made a bridge in their work between Spanish and Swiss music, and between the Protestant North and the Mediterranean warmth of the South. He certainly had an attachment to the music of Spain, and especially the Canary Islands, which gave rise to his Piano Variations (1967) and the piano concerto entitled Concierto de Tenerife (1962), both available on other Guild recordings. In 1991, at the venerable age of 94, Kuhn moved to Ascona, on the Swiss shore of Lake Maggiore, where he died three years later.

According to the noted Swiss critic Willi Schuh, Kuhn’s was a ‘pronouncedly lyrical talent’, with songs and choral music occupying a place of importance in his output. Nevertheless he composed prolifically in a wide spectrum of genres, from operas to small piano pieces. Chris Walton has remarked that Kuhn ‘was rooted in the Swiss Protestant tradition’, but his musical language is an urbane synthesis of several 20th-century tendencies. Kuhn himself, in 1973, described the evolution of his musical language thus: ‘Before 1921, my works were rooted in traditional influences (Bach, Schubert, Wolf). The confrontation with Impressionism and the Second Viennese School and my encounter with Hindemith broadened my means of expression in matters of harmony and formal technique, and enabled me to go my own way (the use of extended tonality, polyphony, and linear counterpoint that takes into account the extended harmonic context)’.
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Hail Mary - Lincoln Cathedral Choir

Hail Mary - Lincoln Cathedral Choir
ID: GMCD7291
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Recorded: Lincoln Cathedral, 31 January, 1 & 3 February 2005

The organ of Lincoln Cathedral
The organ of Lincoln Cathedral was built by ‘Father’ Henry Willis, and completed in 1898. It was the last cathedral organ that Willis finished himself, and, during the twentieth century, escaped the radical tonal changes undergone by many other instruments of its period, being one of only two to retain its original tonal scheme. A rebuild in 1960 involved the addition of a few new registers, but no changes to the existing ones. In its centenary year, 1998, the organ was comprehensively overhauled, but again, all the original material was left unchanged.

A testament to Willis’s genius and perfectionism, this magnificent organ is in daily use, enriching the liturgy through its role as an accompanying instrument. Some of the world’s finest players perform each year in the international recital series, attracted by the organ’s beauty, quality, and timeless musical integrity.

Boy choristers
Nicholas Crossland, Karl Dudman, Oliver Herring, Edward Hewes, Kieren Hill, Joshua Jackson, James King, Jonathan Line, Benedict Martin, Christopher Mitchell, Thomas Mitchell, Benjamin Rawsthorn, James Wafer, Frederick Wright, William Wright

Girl choristers
Philippa Atkinson, Kayleigh Conway-Jarrett, Samantha Conway-Jarrett, Rachael Cox, Keziah Dalton, Eleanor Doughty, Alexandra Dring, Charlotte Harding-Price, Phoebe Kirrage, Esther Lallemant, Lydia Lallemant, Lucy McClaran, Eleanor Perry, Emily Reith, Joanna Rickart, Pippa Roblin, Nadčge Serna, Avalon Summerfield, Claudia Vickers, Olivia Warburton

Charles Harrison - conducted (tracks 2-4, 12 and 14)
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

19 Th Century Organ and Choral Music - The Organ of Katholische Pfarrkirche Ilanz

19 Th Century Organ and Choral Music - The Organ of Katholische Pfarrkirche Ilanz
ID: GMCD7290
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

The Organ of Katholische Pfarrkirche Ilanz

Theophil Forchhammer (1847-1923) is nowadays virtually forgotten, but during his life he was regarded as among the most important and influential organist-composers of his time. Born in Switzerland, in Schiers/Grabünden, he was a member of a prominent family or artists and scholars. He took up his first position as an organist in Thalwil, Switzerland, in 1867, and progressed through a number of different Swiss and German cities before in 1886 he was appointed organist of the cathedral at Magdeburg, in succession to the famous organist August Gottfried Ritter (1811-1885). Forchhammer remained in Magdeburg for the rest of his career; he also became Royal Music Director and a Professor at the University and exercised an influence on musical life throughout the churches of Saxony. He was an outstanding improviser and virtuoso player whose musical thinking was founded on his deep study of J.S. Bach. However, he was also deeply impressed by the music of Liszt, and in his own music - a significant portion of which is now, unfortunately, lost - he attempted a synthesis of Baroque and Romantic principles which makes him a notable forerunner of Max Reger.
Forchhammer’s Second Organ Sonata, op.15, was published in 1886 and bears the subtitle Zur Todtenfeier (for a burial ceremony). It is an imposing work partly based on church chorales, but with episodes of extreme romantic expression which mark it out as highly contemporary in terms of its own era. There are also passages in neo-Baroque style, with which Forchthhammer had already experimented in his First Sonata, but in Sonata No.2 these are more integrated into a wide-ranging stylistic palette. The first movement, in C minor, is frankly episodic in construction and features three principal ideas: a majestic, largely chordal Adagio with a more tender and reflective second strain; a fugal Andante; and an Andantino episode centred on the chorale ‘Jesus meine Zuversicht’, which is interpenetrated by recalls of the Adagio’s second strain. A stormy - and very Lisztian - Allegro development starts by transforming the initial Adagio music and works all the main elements together to a forceful climax and then a brief Adagio coda.

The ensuing Larghetto in A flat is relatively an idyll, a serenade-like movement that introduces fragments of the chorale ‘Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme’ against a Mendelssohnian ‘spinning-song’ accompaniment. There is an intimately expressive central section, and the movement modulates from A flat to C major to run directly into the finale, Andante con moto. This is an imposing, smoothly flowing and finely-worked fugue on a theme derived from this same chorale, ‘Wachet auf’, which sounds out majestically in long note values in the pedals. Very Lisztian is the cadenza-like change to triple time, after which the fugue proceeds more rapidly until it encounters a quiet ‘cyclic’ recall of the Adagio theme from the first movement. The Sonata then concludes with a massive and triumphant full-organ statement of the ‘Wachet auf’ chorale.

Forchhammer’s Choralbearbeitungen zum kirchlichen Gebrauche (Chorale settings for Church use), combining traditional melodies with modern harmony, were among his most admired works. The eight Choralbearbeitungen, op.11, were published in 1887 with a dedication to the composer’s friend Eugen Grüel. We hear two of them in this programme. No.2, ‘Es ist gewisslich an der Zeit’, clothes its melody in graceful subsidiary parts. No.3, ‘Jesus meine Zuversicht’, is a more developed conception, using the same chorale as in the Second Sonata but in very different fashion. Here Forchhammer creates a kind of polyphonic pastoral serenade into which the chorale melody is inserted phrase by phrase as a cantus firmus, with a highly formal concluding cadence.

Fürchtegott Theodor Kirchner (1823-1903) was born in Neunkirchen, near Chemnitz. A prodigy who was giving organ recitals at the age of eight, he studied in Leipzig; but in 1843, on the recommendation of Mendelssohn, took up a post as organist in Winterthur, which marked the beginning of a 30-year sojourn in Switzerland. He was eventually succeeded in Winterthur by Hermann Goetz, and went on to teach and conduct in Zurich. Kirchner only returned to Germany in 1873, and led a rather peripatetic life, teaching in Meiningen, Würzburg, Leipzig, Dresden and Hamburg. Though a man of great charm (he is even believed to have had an affair with Clara Schumann in the 1860s), Kirchner was unworldly, impractical, addicted to gambling, and chronically short of money in later life. He often had to be assisted by his more successful colleagues. But he was much respected by them: Kirchner was a friend of Mendelssohn, the Schumanns, and Brahms, who much esteemed his composing talent, as well as Gade, Grieg and Hanslick. Among Kirchner’s feats of transcription are versions of both Brahms’s string sextets arranged as piano trios. After a series of strokes in the 1890s he was left paralysed and had to be looked after by a former pupil until his death. Kirchner wrote a few chamber works of his own, but no orchestral music at all; on the other hand he was a natural miniaturist and produced a copious number of songs, over a thousand short piano pieces, and many works for organ.

His collection of miscellaneous organ compositions, op.89, was published in Leipzig in 1890. Of the seven works by Kirchner on this disc, six are drawn from that collection. The G minor Präludium (No.2) starts and ends with a full-organ proclamation of real grandeur, between which comes a swift-moving toccata-like passage powered by busy semiquaver motion. The second volume of op.89 has the title Lyrische Blätter, and the serene G major Andante (No.5), which manages to stretch its melodic invention over the entire range of manuals and pedals, is certainly a lyrical outpouring of the kind for which Kirchner was renowned. So are the fragrant yet strangely fragmentary Andantino cantabile in E (No.8) - which reminds us that Hermann Kretschmar singled out Kirchner’s ability to entrust warm emotion to virtual epigrams - and the more expansive Andante cantabile in G flat (No.12). So too is the gentle, lullaby-like E flat Andante, op.82 No.9. The deeply meditative piece in D minor marked Langsam (No.11 of op.89) has a troubled middle section and lingers long in the memory Finally the grand, richly-coloured, contrapuntally masterly Quasi Sarabande in G minor (op.89 No.4) shows the ultra-Romantic Kirchner imbibing the lessons of J.S.Bach.


Benedict Jucker (1811-1876) had a more direct connexion to Bach. He was a student of Johann Christian Heinrich Rinck (once famous for his pedagogical work, ‘Rinck’s Practical Organ School’) and succeeded him as organist at the cathedral in Basle in 1846. As Rinck had studied with J.S. Bach’s pupil Kittel, Jucker could trace his pedagogical lineage back to ‘old Bach’ himself, and among Jucker’s organ works his Fantasie und Fuge über das Thema BACH, on the famous musical ‘signature’ B flat - A - C - B natural, is perhaps the best known. He composed his Nine Choral-Vorspiele, op.7 in 1867 and dedicated the set to his friend, the composer, organist and organ-builder Johann Gottlob Töpfer, on the occasion of the latter’s 50 years’ service in Weimar.

The calm ascending and descending polyphony of ‘Mein Jesu, dem die Seraphinen’ (No.8 of Jucker’s op.7) derives very directly by diminution from the shape of the chorale melody, which is then serenely integrated into the overall texture. No.7, ‘O, wie so gar sanftmüthig’ is a mellifluous, serenade-like conception, its chromatic passing-notes betraying its period and the chorale appearing only fragmentarily as a cantus firmus. Finally No.2, ‘Ach, bleib’ mit deiner Gnade’, in which the chorale melody largely remains in the pedals, opens as a placidly-flowing berceuse but accumulates force with the final appearance of the chorale in octaves.

The best known of these four composers, Josef Gabriel Rheinberger (1839-1901), was born in Liechtenstein and was such an obvious musical Wunderkind that he was appointed organist in the parish church in his home town of Vaduz at the age of seven. He subsequently studied in Munich, becoming in time the piano professor of the Conservatoire there as well as working for the Court Opera. In due course he became professor of organ and of composition at the Conservatoire and director of church music for the Bavarian court. One of the outstanding musical personalities of his time, Rheinberger was an astonishingly productive composer, writing in almost every genre including opera, but it is largely for his organ works - including 20 sonatas and two concertos for organ and orchestra - that he is remembered. Naturally, however, he wrote copious choral music, among which he completed some 18 masses for differing vocal forces and accompaniments. Though a comparatively small-scale work, the Mass in F minor, op.159, for SATB choir with organ accompaniment, has been one of the most admired of these.

The Mass was composed in May and June of 1889 and published the same year in Leipzig, with a dedication to Franz Xaver Haberl (1840-1910), the musicologist, church music reformer, and director of music at Regensburg cathedral. The work was also arranged for chorus and orchestra by one Johannes Meurer, but on this disc we hear Rheinberger’s original. Rheinberger did not altogether follow the precepts of the Cecilian movement, which aimed to restore a Palestrina-like purity to Latin church music, but he was certainly influenced by it. In this Mass it was his intention to achieve both clarity and simplicity of technique. The organ part is straightforward and used almost entirely to support and amplify the vocal texture, any solo episodes being kept very short.

This is a very lyrical Mass, its romanticism apparent in Rheinberger’s glowing and frequently chromatic harmony, handled with great confidence and resource. While the chorus writing in some movements (eg. the Gloria) is predominantly homophonic, Rheinberger also makes use of freely imitative counterpoint (as in the Kyrie) and mixes styles to sometimes dramatic effect, notably in the Credo, which makes effective excursions into D flat and ends with triumphant Amens in F major. The intense Sanctus in A flat is followed by a canonic Benedictus and a pure and song-like Agnus Dei that begins with implications of D minor but works through to a peaceful F major close.

Notes © copyright Malcolm MacDonald
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Reflections • Organ Music by Jennifer Bate

Reflections • Organ Music by Jennifer Bate
ID: GMCD7209
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Played by the composer on the organ of the Brangwyn Hall, Swansea
12.00 eur Buy

Orgelmusik aus Europa - Dietmar Mettlach

Orgelmusik aus Europa - Dietmar Mettlach
ID: IFO00718
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Dietmar Mettlach, organ / Orgel St. Jakobus Schifferstadt
12.00 eur Buy

Vom Barock zur Neuzeit

Vom Barock zur Neuzeit
ID: KUK69
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Concerto for horn & organ
Joachim Bänsch & Erika Krautter-Budday play works by J.S.Bach, Anonymus* (18th century), Gottfried A. Homilius, Robert Schumann, Camille Saint-Saëns, Stanley Weiner, Bernhard Krol.
*with Julia Ströbel-Bänsch & Mirjam Budday (french horn)
A concert recording from the convent church in Maulbronn
12.00 eur Buy

Franz Liszt Organ Works played by Nicolas Kynaston on the Great Klais Organ Ingolstadt

Franz Liszt Organ Works played by Nicolas Kynaston on the Great Klais Organ Ingolstadt
ID: GMCD7210
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

The Klais Organ of Ingolstadt Muenster, Germany
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

In a Monastery Garden • Music by Ketèlby • Callahan • Culp • Rowley • Sowerby and others - Organ

In a Monastery Garden • Music by Ketèlby • Callahan • Culp • Rowley • Sowerby and others - Organ
ID: GMCD7212
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

James Culp at the Great Organ of the First Presbyetrian Church Kilgore, Texas
Recorded at The First Presbyterian Church, Kilgore, Texas - February 1992
12.00 eur Buy

 
Customer: not signed in

CD DVD SACD
Thematic search:
  • Titles
  • Composers
  • Interprets 
  • Ensembles
  • Conductors
  • Instruments
  • Genre
  • Labels
  • Collections
  • Numerical listing
 
We accept PayPal
facebook
With the purchase of more
than 5 CD - your discount
will be 10%. If more than 10 CD - 15%
© 2004 - 2020

RCD - Russian Compact Disk - Russian and World music CD shop and Classic distribution.

All rights reserved.