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Organ Collection, page 25

   Found CDs: 297
 

Harald Feller: Phantômes · An Organ Spectacular

Harald Feller: Phantômes · An Organ Spectacular
ID: OC606
CDs: 1
Type: SACD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

15.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

The Carols Album - Huddersfield Choral Society

The Carols Album - Huddersfield Choral Society
ID: SIGCD108
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Choral and Organ

Following their highly successful releases on Signum (the Hymns Album and Handel’s Messiah conducted by Sir Charles Mackerras) the Huddersfield Choral Society is back in force with a magnificent collection of Christmas carols. This CD will be a perfect Christmas gift or glorious self-indulgence, absorbing the sacred and profane alike, beautifully performed and recorded for the festive season.
15.00 eur Buy

Beyond the Score: Organ Improvisations for Whit Sunday

Beyond the Score: Organ Improvisations for Whit Sunday
ID: SIGCD028
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Programme Note

The art of musical improvisation is as old as music itself, and it makes the practice of reading from notated music-which in the West has happened for little more than a millennium-a relative newcomer to the repertoire of options available to the performing musician.

Despite the predominance of printed music, improvisation is all around us if we care to look; the organist playing before or after a church service and accompanying the psalm singing; the singer or instrumentalists ornamenting their lines in the repeated section of a baroque aria; the soloist playing a cadenza in the last movement of a concerto; the jazz band in a night club playing between their prepared numbers; the music students at school or college having an out of hours ‘jam session’.

We can only wonder at the sheer quantity of improvised music that has come and gone and is lost for ever, but equally we must marvel at the sheer inventiveness of human kind and take comfort in the amount of improvised music that is yet to come!

The invention of musical notation, codified by Guido d’Arezzo in the 11th century, was intended as an aide-mémoire to reduce the time it took boys and novice monks to learn the church’s enormous repertoire of plainchant. Notation meant that musical ideas could be worked out and captured for circulation; musical forms could now develop and the art of composition was born. Now, performers could submerse themselves in other musicians’ styles enabling their own musical development to be widened and accelerated.

Similarly, the late nineteenth century invention of audio recording equipment meant that not only could performing musicians now hear a wider variety of performance styles-be it on wax cylinder or digital compact disc-but improvised performances need not always be lost for ever. The availability of recordings of past masters’ organ improvisations, including those of Charles Tournemire, Maurice Duruflé and Pierre Cochereau, has undoubtedly affected today’s younger generation of organist improvisers.

Clues about improvisatory styles from the last millennium are to be found in contemporary notated works. Heinrich Isaac (1450-1517) left a number of mass settings for alternatim choir and organ and similar traditions developed throughout Renaissance Europe, including England, where in some institutions the organ would improvise alternate verses of the office hymns. Many of these ‘improvised’ verses were captured and copied by enthusiasts such as the famous sixteenth century organist Thomas Mulliner.

With the formation of concert societies in the 18th century, improvisation found a new secular audience. Handel entertained the crowds during the interval of his oratorio premieres in the 1730s and 40s by improvising at the organ and this style is clearly seen in the notated organ concerti which he published in response to great demand from his public.

In classical France the organ masses by de Grigny and Couperin are rare instances of a written-down ‘improvised’ tradition. Musical notation apart, further evidence of the nature of the tradition is found in a liturgical document of 1662: the Cérémonial des évęques outlines the soloistic role of the organist in the mass at the following key points: Introit, Gradual, Offertory, Elevation, Communion, and Sortie. These improvisations would have been substantial, while shorter improvisations would alternate with the choir’s singing of the ordinary chant.

Whilst the written-down improvisations of earlier times provide us with a stylised snapshot of the creativity of the time, the ‘stylus phantasticus’ of the 17th and 18th century North Germans was improvisatory by its very nature. Virtually all of J. S. Bach’s preludes and fugues display improvisatory characteristics clearly informed by his elder, Dietrich Buxtehude, whom he admired greatly and travelled long distances to hear. The great G minor fugue BWV 524 is thought to be a written-down improvisation, since the theme was given to applicants for the post of Hamburg Cathedral organist in 1725. On another occasion, Bach apparently improvised for half an hour on An den Wasserflüssen Babylon when unsuccessfully applying for the organist post at St Jacob’s, Hamburg, in 1720. (The successful candidate was required to pay the church authorities a hefty bribe, which Bach was not prepared to do.)

Until the end of the 19th century the organ course at the Paris Conservatoire was centred around improvisation. Widor’s professorship (1890-1937) saw a shift away from this position, but important additions to the 20th century repertoire are nevertheless improvisation based: the five Tournemire improvisations transcribed by Duruflé (1936); Dupré’s Symphonie-Passion (1921); Messiaen’s Messe de la Pentecôte (1950); Bovet’s Trois Préludes Hambourgeois (1970-86); Rogg’s Partita sopra Nun freut euch (1976-95); and of course the improvisations of Cochereau transcribed by David Briggs, François Lombard and others. The art continues to flourish on the continent in the hands of such luminaries as Guy Bovet, Peter Planyavsky, Jos van der Kooy and Naji Hakim.

Why is it that the art of improvisation is seen as largely a continental skill with England being a poor relation? Whereas civic pride in Europe might manifest itself in the building of a splendid organ for the town hall or church, England’s musical heritage is vested in a choral tradition. The English choral tradition is, of course, second to none and must go a long way to explaining the English organ’s strong accompaniment qualities. The predominance of ‘repertoire’ training today means that most young English organists unwittingly turn their backs on what is after all the very life-blood of the repertoire. Perhaps the art has been marginalised by its inclusion in exams as a keyboard ‘test’ (along with harmonisation, transposition and score reading which are, of course, important skills). As a result, improvisation has been viewed, at best, as ‘polyfilla’ for a delayed liturgical procession or, at worst, an exam exercise.

However, in recent times the English art of improvisation has undergone a much-needed recovery championed by David Briggs, Wayne Marshall, Nigel Allcoat and others. Disciplined improvisation with form and structure is increasingly seen as an essential part of the organist’s ‘tool kit’. It is now more common for organ recitals to include an improvised item as part of the programme and many of the historic recordings of Cochereau’s improvisations are again available on disc.

The past 1000 years have yielded an incredible legacy of notated music but, as we have become aware of other cultures’ improvised musical traditions, attitudes to notated music have shifted. Take the creative procedures of jazz musicians, rock bands or the aleatory movement of the late 20th century, for example. There will always be a place for written music, but we must not be prisoners to it.

Alexander Mason, Alistair Dixon, August 2000
15.00 eur Buy

J. S. Bach - The Art of Fugue

J. S. Bach - The Art of Fugue
ID: SIGCD027
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection

Colm Carey at the organ of the Dutch Church, Austin Friars, London
15.00 eur Buy

J. S. BACH : Clavierübung - Tiel 3

 J. S. BACH : Clavierübung - Tiel 3
ID: IFO00313_14
CDs: 2
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Johann Andreas Engelhard-Orgel (1843-45) der Nicolaikirche zu Herzberg am Harz

Cembalo (Replik von Dietrich Hein, nach deutschen Vorbildern des frühen 18. Jahrhunderts)
15.00 eur Buy

Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique / L. van Beethoven - Leonore Overture - Philharmonia Orchestra - Esa-Pekka Salonen

Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique / L. van Beethoven - Leonore Overture - Philharmonia Orchestra - Esa-Pekka Salonen
ID: SIGCD193
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Orchestra

The Philharmonia Orchestra is one of the world's great orchestras. Acknowledged as the UK's foremost musical pioneer, with an extraordinary recording legacy, the Philharmonia leads the field for its quality of playing, and for its innovative approach to audience development, residencies, music education and the use of new technologies in reaching a global audience. Together with its relationships with the world's most sought-after artists, most importantly its Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor Esa-Pekka Salonen, the Philhamonia Orchestra is at the heart of British musical life.

Since September 2008 Salonen has been Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor of the Philharmonia Orchestra. In his first season in this role he devised and led City of Dreams, a nine-month exploration of the music and culture of Vienna between 1900 and 1935. The project, which presented the music of Mahler, Schoenberg, Zemlinsky and Berg in its social and historical context, travelled to 18 cities across Europe, culminating in October 2009 with semi-staged performances of Berg's Wozzeck, with Simon Keenlyside in the title role. A series of recordings from the project is being released on the Philharmonia/Signum label, of which Gurrelieder is already available.
15.00 eur Buy

Joachim Blume - Orgelmusik

Joachim Blume - Orgelmusik
ID: TLS041
CDs: 2
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Die Werke von Joachim Blume, lange Jahre Professor für Komposition an der Musikhochschule Köln, sind so gut wie unbekannt. Umso verdienstvoller ist diese erste Portrait-CD mit Kammermusik aus den Jahren 1956-85. Sie dokumentiert elf Kompositionen unterschiedlichster Technik, Stilistik und Überzeugungskraft, die, fern aller Schulen und Moden, aber auch jeder Publikumsanbiederung, den Hörer unmittelbar ansprechen.
15.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Handel - Complete Organ Concertos - Christian Schmitt (5 CD Set)

Handel - Complete Organ Concertos - Christian Schmitt (5 CD Set)
ID: BRIL92296
CDs: 5
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

15.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Messiaen - Livre du Saint Sacrement - Jörg Abbing, organ

Messiaen - Livre du Saint Sacrement - Jörg Abbing, organ
ID: IFO00801_2
CDs: 2
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

Jörg Abbing spielt von Olivier Messiaen (1908-92) "Livre du Saint Sacrement" von 1985/86 Doppel-CD (123 Min. Gesamtspielzeit!) Symphonische Walcker/Kuhn-Orgel Saint-Francois de Lausanne (CH)
15.00 eur Buy

English Organ Music from the Temple Church - James Vivian

English Organ Music from the Temple Church - James Vivian
ID: SIGCD223
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Organ Collection
Subcollection: Organ

In keeping with the historic nature of the Temple Church, the first mention of an organ there dates back to 1308 - although the organ on this recording, made by Harrison & Harrison, dates from 1954 (after the previous organ was destroyed during the blitz in 1941).
The varied programme touches on a multitude of works for organ by English composers, all of which bring out different facets of this versatile instrument. The organist, James Vivian, has been part of the music department at the Temple Church since 1997, working first with the then director of music Stephen Layton before taking on the role himself in 2006.
Including works by Percy Whitlock, Henry Walford Davies, John Stanley, Samuel Sebastian Wesley, Frank Bridge, Basil Harwood, Francis Jackson and Herbert Howells.
This disc is complemented by the release The Temple Church Choir's 'The Majesty of Thy Glory': Choral Works by Britten, Elgar, Howells and Purcell, also released this month.
15.00 eur Buy

 
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