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Chamber Music, page 24

   Found CDs: 954
 

F. J. Haydn - Sonatas for Violin and Fortepiano Hob. XVa - XV 31, 32 - Alberto Bologni, violino - Giuseppe Fausto Modugno, fortepiano

F. J. Haydn - Sonatas for Violin and Fortepiano Hob. XVa - XV 31, 32 - Alberto Bologni, violino - Giuseppe Fausto Modugno, fortepiano
ID: CNT2048
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Violin

World Premiere Recording
DDD 32 bit recording - mastered at 64 bit
12 pages booklet I/E

Alberto Bologni, violin, Santo Serafino 1734
Giuseppe Fausto Modugno, fortepiano, Johann Schantz 1815

It's known that in the Hoboken catalogue, except for Hob:32 - which has been for a long time considered as the sole authentic Sonata for violin and piano by Haydn and published in Vienna in 1794 by Artaria - there isn't any further Sonata for these instruments; surely a bit surprising since we are talking about the composer who has been from everyone acknowledged as the father of string quartet. However Alberto Bologni and Giuseppe Modugno have discovered within the archives of the Civico Museo Bibliografico in Bologna, the copy of a printed edition dating to the early 1800's which are supposedly including other three Sonatas, i.e. XVa. Among these at least the entire Sonata in C major had been performed by the well-known Italian violinist Sandro Materassi together with his friend Luigi Dallapiccola. Remarkable the fact that both of the last concerts he performed in his career opened with the Sonata in C. Let's leave to the musicologists any discussion to this regard, we should just enjoy this delightful music which is enhanced by the extraordinary instruments which have been used for this recording: an original fortepiano Johann Schantz dated from 1815 (which was considered as the "Stradivari" among fortepianos in Vienna during the 19th century and even Franz Joseph Haydn was fond of such precious instrument) and a beautiful violin Santo Serafino dated from 1734. The recording is well performed by two excellent artists as Giuseppe Modugno and Alberto Bologni who give us moments of real good music.
13.00 eur Buy

Nino Rota -Cello Concerto No.2 (1973), Concerto for strings (1977), Trio for clarinet, cello and piano

Nino Rota -Cello Concerto No.2 (1973), Concerto for strings (1977), Trio for clarinet, cello and piano
ID: CNT2043
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano and Cello

64 bit recording
Booklet: Italiano / English

The rediscovery in recent years of the enormous catalogue of Nino Rota's music held by the Cini Foundation in Venice is perhaps finally inverting an inversely proportional trend between the composer's popularity as author of film music and as classical music composer. In fact, if on the one hand the happy, thirty-year-long artistic marriage between Federico Fellini and himself inevitably led to identifying the composer with the sound tracks of many twentieth century masterpieces of the "seventh art" (La Strada, La dolce vita, Amarcord, Prova d'orchestra only to name a few of his films with Fellini, but also: Rocco e i suoi fratelli by Luchino Visconti, The Godfather - which earned him an oscar - by Francis Ford Coppola, as well as many others) on the other hand we are beginning to rediscover an artist who fits perfectly (who better than he?) in the area circumscribed by those parameters which delimit "Italian excellence", a much discussed phenomenon today, if not always intentionally. Refined, gifted with the same ease for composing that Mozart had (at the age of eleven he wrote his first Oratorio), but at the same time aloof and ironic, with a melancholic and paradoxical outlook on mankind, Rota is for both musicologists and impassioned fans - as they gradually uncover some new masterpiece played in concert halls - a constant surprise. This recording presents his Concerto per violoncello with Enrico Bronzi, one of the greatest and most sensitive musicians of the new generation, playing the solo part and leading the excellent Musici di Parma also in the undisputedly neoclassic Concerto per Archi (presented here in the revised version from 1977). In the Trio con clarinetto of 1973, the magic sound of Alessandro Carbonare blends together with that of Bronzi and Miodini (who play together in the Trio di Parma).
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Ildebrando Pizzetti - Sonata in A for piano and violin - Sonata in F for piano and cello

Ildebrando Pizzetti - Sonata in A for piano and violin - Sonata in F for piano and cello
ID: CNT2057
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: String instruments

Not even three years stand between the two Sonatas presented together in this CD. In this short period of time the composer's personal life was turned completely upside down by the sudden and unexpected death of his wife.
We can feel just the same dramatic tension animates the Sonata in A from beginning to end; "Tempestoso", a dialogue between two characters - the piano and the violin - opens the first movement and the dramatic tension, riddled with a suffering humanity. Pizzetti's dualism between dramatic excitement and soothing meditation is strongly reinforced in the second movement: entitled by the composer "Preghiera per gli Innocenti" [Prayer for the Innocents. Here, too, is the echo of a distant polyphonic response. In the end comes the catharsis, through the gentleness of the prayer, the final, liberating movement where Pizzetti opens to a different, but just as basic, sensibility, one enlivened by hints of the rustic life, riddled with popular whims.
Finished in March 1919 and published by the English editor Chester, the Sonata was first performed in July 1919 played by Ernesto Consolo and Mario Corti and was to become part of the repertoire of many famous performers.
The emotional circumstances surrounding the creation of the Sonata for Cello can be seen in the very structure of the piece in the arch drawn by the three movements. When Pizzetti began to compose the Sonata in F on July 27th, 1921, only a few months had passed since his wife, a young pianist had tragically died. The composer introduces the Cello in the opening "Largo", which is clearly a dialogue between the two instruments. The piano evokes and talks of things, while the cello is suffering personified. It is a dialogue infused with a secret restlessness. This gentleness however does not stop the grief from erupting violently in the second movement "Molto concitato e angoscioso" with the piano's tumultuous, unisonous quadruplets over which the various, harsh notes of the cello are introduced: ephemeral moments of suspense, interrupted by the plundering return of the quadruplets. It is only in the final bars of the soul's torment seems to abate. With the beginning of the third movement, the cello has melted, and becomes "stanco e triste" in an anxious monologue where it gradually evolves into sweet melodic whisper. The piano enters discretely with arpeggiated sequences to slowly, gently, "con crescente emozione" arrive at a delicate embrace that lets comforting light shine through to the "perdendosi" finale.
The Sonata was first performed at the Società del Quartetto in Milan in December 1921 by Ernesto Consolo and Enrico Mainardi.
13.00 eur Buy

Ildebrando Pizzetti - Trio di Parma, piano, violin, cello

Ildebrando Pizzetti - Trio di Parma, piano, violin, cello
ID: CNT2056
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Historical Instruments

Booklet: Italiano / English

The works presented by the Trio di Parma in this first CD are paying homage to the great Italian composer Ildebrando Pizzetti. However lately he hasn't been performed so much anymore and therefore his works remained quite unexplored, especially as far as the chamber instrumental production is concerned. And yet the Trio has been performed for the first time in '25 by some exceptional artists like George Enesco, playing the violin and Hans Kindler the cello. Even Tre Canti , just one year before, had been first executed at Palazzo Pitti in Florence by a prodigy of performing like Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco and Enrico Mainardi. We may then enjoy listening to some really precious works for violin and piano which are well completing the CD (i.e. two Arias and a Colloquio) among which a worldpremiére written for cello: an extemporaneous homage to a very young cellist (just seven years old) named Amedeo Baldovino, who has then turned to be one of the major cello interpreter at that time.
The notes which introduce this recording are well written by Gian Paolo Minardi, while the Trio di Parma is herein giving us a fascinating interpretation of some works written by his renowned fellow citizen, coming from the beautiful town of Parma as well.
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J.Hoffmann, G.F. Giuliani - Music for violin and mandolin from the 18th century, Ensemble Baschenis

J.Hoffmann, G.F. Giuliani - Music for violin and mandolin from the 18th century, Ensemble Baschenis
ID: CNT2059
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Historical Instruments

Booklet: Italiano / English

* Performing instruments: violin, Lombard mandolin, cello, theorbo
** Performing instruments: violin, Neapolitan mandolin, cello, theorbo

The Violin and the Mandolin, accomplices and rivals: in the field of musical literature of XVIII and XIX centuries, many violinists and composers who knew the mandolin - such as Vivaldi, Van Hall, Beethoven, Calace, Giuliani, Hoffman and many others - transposed their knowledge from one instrument to the other: the bow's beats turned into strokes of the plectrum, while arpeggios, double string chords and virtuosities began to be used very frequently. Asort of expressive complicity or even a strong rivalry between the violin and the mandolin can be due to many factors: the simple possibility of passing from one instrument to another, the use of a similar virtuoso technique and the presence of an analogous instrumental idiom. Complicity comes from the rules of their common language, while rivalry is caused by the attempt to take the lead and to fascinate the listener.
Giovanni Francesco Giuliani was a violinist, a harpist, master of harpsichord and singing; what is clearly evident is that the composer had a particular skill and a rich inspiration in making the instruments talk together, thus obtaining the most of their timbre's variety and their technical and expressive possibilities. This recording proposes the even numbered Quartets no. 2, no.4 and no.6.
Very little is known about Giovanni Hoffmann, but it's sure that at the end of XVIII century he was one of the top virtuosi upon the mandolin. Herewith performed the Divertimenti number 3 and 4.
The Ensemble Baschenis took the manuscripts of the Quartets directly from Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Vienna and edited them directly from the microfilm.
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English Piano Music (Gurney, Elgar, Howells) - Alan Gravill, Jeremy Fisell

English Piano Music (Gurney, Elgar, Howells)  - Alan Gravill, Jeremy Fisell
ID: DSPRCD059
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Originally recorded for Gamut in 1990 and 1994, these recordings of unusual piano repertoire are now available on CD for the first time in 20 years -a must have for piano music enthusiasts!
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IVANA GAVRIĆ - IN THE MISTS - Janáček - Schubert - Liszt - Rachmaninov

IVANA GAVRIĆ - IN THE MISTS - Janáček - Schubert - Liszt - Rachmaninov
ID: CHRCD009
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music

A stunning new solo release from young pianist, Ivana Gavric, taking its title from the featured Janáček work, In The Mists.

Mid-2010 marks a double debut for Sarajevo-born In The Mists pianist, Ivana Gavrić, who will play at the Wigmore Hall for her first solo recital there, and in association with Champs Hill Records, release her first CD, In The Mists.

Moving to London in 1992 at the start of the Bosnian War, Ivana, the daughter of a pianist and then aged 12, studied at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Cambridge University, and the Royal College of Music.

About her, Musical Opinion recently wrote: ‘Outstandingly successful in every regard… flawless performance... a young artist who is destined for the highest rank.’

This new CD, recorded recently in the Music Room at Champs Hill (from where the label takes its name), takes its title from the featured Janáček work.

About the programme, Ivana says: "The Schubert is a core around which I have constructed the programme - I have always felt comfortable playing works of Classical construction, and the A minor Sonata (D784) opens with a Slavic tint which, to me, foretells Mussorgsky. I find it important to create a journey for both the audience, and myself, that shows all the aspects of my musical personality; the introspective and haunting images in Janáček’s ‘In the Mists’ conveys this, while the Rachmaninov pieces add passion and lyricism.”

Also featured on this CD, are Liszt’s stunningly melodic Petrarch Sonnets, bringing the playing time to just over 73 minutes.
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Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio

Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio
ID: CHRCD012
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Tchaikovsky wrote comparatively little chamber music, yet his Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50, with its kaleidoscopic succession of moods, is probably the first important piano trio by a Russian composer; and it proved very influential. Up to his forties Tchaikovsky had felt an antipathy to the piano trio-combination, and had refused to write one for his patroness, Nadezhda von Meck (whose resident piano trio included, as pianist, a French teenager called Claude Debussy). The occasion that caused Tchaikovsky to change his attitude was the death in March 1881 of the pianist and pedagogue Nikolai Rubinstein, founder of the Moscow Conservatoire, who had not only been a friend but one of Tchaikovsky's sternest critics and most faithful supporters. Deeply affected by losing this significant figure in his life, for a while Tchaikovsky seemed quite unable to compose. He planned a new opera, but then found himself composing the Piano Trio as a tribute to Rubinstein's memory - the dedication actually reads ‘in memory of a great artist'. Tchaikovsky told Countess von Meck that he selected the genre as a means of ‘testing himself', perhaps in order to assure himself that he was still fulfilling Rubinstein's exacting standards. The Trio was composed in Rome during the winter of 1881-2; Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoli that he was ‘completely engrossed in my new trio, and attracted by this new form of music which I have not tried before and is quite new to me'. After he had finished it he wrote again that ‘it pleases me greatly. Later, maybe, I shall renounce it, and hate it as much as I hate most of my works. At the moment, however, I am proud of it, it satisfies me, and raises me in my own esteem. Lately I felt sure I should not be able to compose any more and life without creative work is pretty pointless.'
Certainly the Trio is a big, ambitious piece in which the composer sets himself a multitude of challenges in what was for him a new medium. After a private performance in April 1882 Tchaikovsky made some revisions before the public premiere, which took place at the Moscow Conservatoire on 18 October with Taneyev playing the taxing piano part. The work was not well received by the press, but did not take long to make its way into the repertoire, where it stands to this day as one of the supreme examples of the piano trio in the Romantic era. Tchaikovsky later sanctioned substantial cuts in its formidable length. The expansive and passionate first movement brims with melodic ideas; it begins with a lyrical tune entrusted to the cello which produces many offshoots in the course of a lengthy exposition. Contrasting with this is a heroic, even martial theme distinguished by massive chordal writing in the piano - indeed the piano part throughout this Trio often resembles the solo part in a concerto. The development section includes a substantial dialogue between cello and piano, and in the coda the opening theme turns elegiac, with a tender duet for violin and cello before the movement finds its calm, sad close. The slow movement is a Theme and Variations, a form of which Tchaikovsky was already an established master. This E major movement is perhaps the most personal and unusual in inspiration of all his variation-sets. He associated the poised and almost classical theme - first stated by the piano - with Rubinstein himself, and the ensuing eleven variations chronicle incidents in Rubinstein's life and memories of times he and Tchaikovsky spent together. As the composer wrote to his halfbrother Modest, ‘one variation is a memory of a trip to an Amusement Park out of town, another of a ball to which we both went and so on'. The Amusement Park is probably to be heard in the quicksilver scherzo of the third variation, the ball in the sixth variation's sumptuous waltz - which also refers to Tchaikovsky's opera Eugene Onegin. But it is better not to look for particular ‘programmatic' connotations in the others. The brief fifth variation, with its high piano writing, is clearly a brilliant evocation of a musical box, according to some commentators - but a ‘troika' or
sleigh-ride, according to others. The eighth is a robust fugue, followed by a lamenting ninth variation marked flebile (mourning, plaintive) with Aeolian-harp figuration in the piano, and a tenth in lively mazurka rhythm. The eleventh variation closes the movement with an enriched restatement of the original theme. Though the second movement is over, the variation process is not. Tchaikovsky's third movement opens with what is, in effect, the twelfth variation in the sequence - a splendidly exciting and vivacious one, large and bold enough to initiate a full-scale finale in A major. It enacts a more or less complete sonata design before its triumphal elation is interrupted by the return of the soulful lyric theme that began the ‘Pezzo elegiaco' first movement, in drastically afflicted unison on the strings against a turbulently emotional piano part. This sudden outpouring of grief issues in a doom-laden coda marked lugubre, where the opening theme is heard for the last time against a Chopinesque funeral-march rhythm in the piano, ebbing away into silence. Tchaikovsky's Trio, with its function as a memorial for Nikolai Rubinstein, seems to have initiated a Russian tradition of ‘elegiac' piano trios - Arensky, for instance, wrote a trio inspired by the death of his (and Tchaikovsky's) friend, the cellist Davidoff. The young Sergei Rachmaninov actually entitled both his early piano trios, composed in quick succession in 1892 and 1893, Trio élégiaque; and the second of those was written under the shock of hearing of the sudden death of Tchaikovsky, who had encouraged him while Rachmaninov was still a student. That three-movement Trio in D minor is by far the better known of the two. Its predecessor, the Trio élégiaque No. 1 in G minor, was written at white-hot speed between 18 and 21 January 1892 and premiered in a recital that the 18-year-old Rachmaninov gave at Moscow Conservatory, where he was still a student, on 30 January. Rachmaninov naturally took the piano part, with his friends the violinist
David Krein and the cellist Anatoly Brandukov (for whom he would later compose a celebrated Cello Sonata.) As far as is known this was its first and last hearing in Rachmaninov's lifetime, and the work was not published until 1947. The fact that it was so speedily written, for performance by the composer himself, probably accounts for the large number of errors in the manuscript and almost complete lack of dynamics in the manuscript, which had to be heavily edited before it was printed. If the later D minor Trio is an elegy for Tchaikovsky, there is no evidence to suggest who might be the subject of the G minor. Its ‘elegiac' nature quite possibly arose from Rachmaninov's own current emotional state. The previous August he had caught a fever as a result of swimming in the chilly waters of the River Matir; his health had deteriorated throughout the Autumn and, though he gradually recovered, he had spent much of the winter in a state of depression. This would seem an adequate explanation for the mood of the Trio, which despite a fine show of activity in its central section seems to end in darkness and despair. The work is in a single movement in a broad sonata-form, with room for some contrasting episodes. Not surprisingly, Rachmaninov assigns pride of place to the piano, making the Trio almost a miniature piano concerto (it was in fact composed shortly after his Piano Concerto No. 1). It opens (with the characteristic expressionmark Lento lugubre) with murmuring, wind-blown string figures that create an evocative background to the dolorous - and already highly charcteristic - main theme, enunciated by the piano. After the strings have had a chance with this melody the music moves to a more active contrasting subject in story-telling style. The development section, marked Apassionato, is principally based on the opening theme and, after a climax and a silence, leads to a full-scale recapitulation of the opening materials. The work concludes with an impressively gloomy coda in the style of a funeral march.
Notes (c) 2010, Malcolm MacDonald
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Johannes Brahms - Chamber Music - The Schubert Ensemble - William Howard

Johannes Brahms - Chamber Music - The Schubert Ensemble - William Howard
ID: CHRCD011
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

“As with so much in Brahms' life, the genesis of his Piano Quintet, op.34, was fraught with indecision and introspection...” Brahms first wrote this work scored for string quintet, and after taking to heart criticism from Joachim, he not only re-scored the work for two pianos, but destroyed the original string quintet manuscript. Published in 1874, this new du version was not without problems, and it was Clara Schumann who pointed these out, causing Brahms to set about re-arranging the music once more, this time for piano quintet.
This was no simple re-scoring, for the piano quintet medium has unique demands, but, at last, “Brahms had found the medium through which his material could speak most eloquently.” It is the quintet in this final guise that we know it best, and that the Schubert Ensemble deliver here on this recording in an assured and expressive performance, allowing the sophisticated detail of Brahms' writing to throw us into the depths of emotion he conjures up.
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PIERNÉ- LOEFFLER - DURUFLÉ- William Dazeley - London Conchord Ensemble

PIERNÉ- LOEFFLER - DURUFLÉ- William Dazeley - London Conchord Ensemble
ID: CHRCD010
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

The London Conchord Ensemble are joined on this disc by the baritone William Dazeley, presenting a seductive collection of fascinating chamber works and songs written by three major 20th Century French chamber music composers.Sensual and intimate, these works epitomise these works epitomise the music of early 20th-century France, with their fluid lines and unusual textures, sensitively captured here by Conchord.

Though born in Berlin, Charles Loeffler claimed to hail from Alsace, so strongly did he identify with the French aesthetic. His Five Songs set poetry by French poets Baudelaire and Verlaine, and his musical style recalls Franck, Chausson and Debussy. Add to this a Russian sense of instrumental colour, and the result is a fascinating concoction of expressive and of expressive and evocative musical elements. Pierné's Sonata Da Camera is reminiscent of Debussy's seminal Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp in its poignant colours and intricatetextures, while Duruflé's Prélude Recitatif et Variations reveals a different style from that of his Variations reveals a different style from that of his famous Requiem in writing that recalls Ravel.
Throughout this disc, Conchord plays with an effortless grace and flair, a finesse that perfectly, a finesse that perfectly communicates this exquisite selection of music.
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